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Publications

*Bolded names indicate that the author was a student. On student first-author papers, Dr. Leanne Son Hing was the direct supervisor guiding theory, design, and analysis and cowrote the paper.

Selected Publications

Son Hing, L. (2022). The myth of meritocracy in scientific institutions . Science, 377(6608), 824–824. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.add5909

Lee, R. S., Son Hing, L. S., Gnanakumaran, V., Weiss, S., Lero, D. S., Hausdorf, P. A., & Daneman, D. (2021). Inspired but tired: How medical faculty’s job demands and resources lead to engagement, work-life conflict burnout. Frontiers in Psychology.  doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2021.609639 

Lee, R. S., Son Hing, L. S., Gnanakumaran, V., Weiss, S., Lero, D. S., Hausdorf, P. A., & Daneman, D. (2021). Inspired but tired: How medical faculty’s job demands and resources lead to engagement, work-life conflict burnout. Frontiers in Psychology

Lee, R. & Son Hing, L. S. (2021). A Report of Veterinarian Well-Being and Ill-Being During COVID- 19. Canadian Veterinary Medical Association. https://www.canadianveterinarians.net/news- events/news/veterinarian-well-ill-being-covid

Sakr, N. & Son Hing. (2021). Maintaining Diversity Climate Can Now be Measured with Free Diversity Climate Assessment from University of Guelph. The Centre for Global Inclusion. https://centreforglobalinclusion.org/free-diversity-climate-assessment/

Son Hing, L.S. & Lee, R. (2020). A Report of Faculty Well-Being and Ill-Being during COVID-19. University of Guelph. https://genderequity.uoguelph.ca/report-faculty-well-being-and-ill-being-during-covid-19

Son Hing, L. S., Wilson, A., Gourevitch, P., English, J., & Sin, P. (2019). Failure to respond to rising income inequality: Processes that legitimize growing disparities. Daedalus: Journal of the American Academy of Arts and Science. 148(3), 105-135.

Son Hing, L S; Wilson, A E; Gourevitch, P; English, J; Sin, P. (2019). Psychological Responses to Rising Income Inequality: Processes that Legitimize Growing Disparities. Daedalus, 148(3), 105-135. 

Stamarski, C; Son Hing, L. (2015). Gender Inequalities in the Workplace: The effects of organizational structures, processes, practices, and decision makers’ sexism. Frontiers in Psychology, 6, 1-35.

Mishra, S; Son Hing, L; Lalumiere, M. (2015). Inequality and Risk Taking. Evolutionary Psychology, 13(3). 

Stamarski, C; Son Hing, L. (2015). Gender Inequalities in the Workplace: The effects of organizational structures, processes, practices, and decision makers’ sexism. Frontiers in Psychology, 6, 1-35.

Provided a theoretical model for understanding gender inequalities in the literature and reviewed relevant research. Cited 279 times including reports by the National Academy of Sciences (USA) on (a) sexual harassment,and on (b) mentorship in STEMM.

Son Hing, L; Bobocel, D R; Zanna, M P; Garcia, D C; Gee, S; K. Orazietti.(2011). The merit of meritocracy. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 101(3), 433-450.

Demonstrated that raising awareness of discrimination in the assessment of women and minorities’ merit can lead to greater support for diversity initiatives. Cited 207 times, including handbooks and international journals.

Son Hing, L; Chung-Yan, G; Hamilton, L K;Zanna, M P. (2008). A two-dimensional model that employs explicit and implicit attitudes to characterize prejudice. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 94(6), 971-987.

Demonstrated effects of implicit prejudice in hiring discrimination. Cited 237 times, including law reviews and journals in other disciplines.

Son Hing, L; Bobocel, D R; Zanna, M P. (2002). Meritocracy and opposition to affirmative action: Making concessions in the face of discrimination. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 83(3), 493-509.

Demonstrated that concerns with merit drive reactions to affirmative action beyond prejudice. Cited 250 times including annual reviews and policy outlets. It has had impact beyond academe (e.g., cited in a report for the British Ministry of Defence on inclusivity).

Son Hing, L; Li, W; Zanna, M P. (2002). Inducing hypocrisy to reduce prejudicial responses among aversive racists. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 38(1), 71-78.

Demonstrated that measures of implicit and explicit bias can be used to identify aversive racists and that hypocrisy induction will reduce discrimination among them. Cited 290 times. It has beencited in a report by the World Wildlife Foundation on the role of human identity in meeting environmental challenges and in a report by the National Centre for State Courts (USA) on implicit bias in the courts.

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